Conservation: Sculpture

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Arresting our attention in its 3-demensions, a sculpture demands to be noticed just as a Red Wood Tree or a skyscraper does.

BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE
The individual nature of sculpture requires an individually based approach for its care. The materials used and the dimensions of the sculpture are a major part to its conservation, but not the only ones.

Stone and metal are the two most conventional materials used in sculpture, but because of the myriad of possible materials, as well as composite materials, it is essential to consult with a conservator to determine the appropriate care, cleaning, handling and transporting of your piece. For the purpose of clarity stone and metal sculpture will be focused on here.

CARE, CLEANING, HANDLING AND TRANSPORTING
Stone Pieces:

  • Do not touch sculpture with bare hands, always wear gloves
  • Identify type of stone material i.e. a soft stone or a harder one
  • Consult a conservator for appropriate light, temperature and humidity settings
  • Consult a conservator on optimum cleaning method for that particular metal
  • Routine dusting with a feather duster and vacuum with soft brush nozzle is generally acceptable
  • Sculptures that were traditionally kept outdoors should be kept indoors
  • If small sculptures must be moved a short distance, be aware and thoughtful
  • Only move small or large sculptures a long distance with the assistance of professional art movers

Metal Pieces:

  • Do not touch sculpture with bare hands, always wear gloves
  • Identify type of metal material
  • Consult a conservator for appropriate temperature and humidity settings
  • Consult a conservator on optimum cleaning method for that particular metal
  • Sculptures that were traditionally kept outdoors should be kept indoors
  • If small sculptures must be moved a short distance, be aware and thoughtful
  • Only move small or large sculptures a long distance with the assistance of professional art movers

STORAGE
Storage of any kind should first be discussed with a conservator to establish appropriate materials so as not to damage the piece.

 

Featured Providers

AAMG / Art Asset Management Group, Inc.

[Not Rated Yet]
Xiliary Twil, Accredited Senior Appraiser Fine Art 8549 Wilshire Blvd.
Suite 184
Beverly Hills, CA 90211

Parr Conservation Services, LLC

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Deborah Duerbeck Parr PO Box 239
Burkittsville, MD 21718

Anne Zanikos Art Conservation

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Anne Zanikos 1023 Shook Avenue
San Antonio, Texas 78212

Boro 6 Art Conservation

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Jakki Godfrey
Jersey City, New Jersey 07302

John Scott Conservator of Art and Architecture

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John Scott, MA, MA-CAS, FRMS, FNYMS, PA-AIC, IIC, ICOMCC POB 20098LT, NYC, NY 10011-0008
Forgedale Rd, POB 206, Fleetwood, PA, 19522

ConservArt

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George Schwartz 6620 E Rogers Cir
Boca Raton, FL 33487

Fine Arts Conservation LLC

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Irena Calinescu 4949 Hollywood Blvd
Suite 210
Los Angeles, California 90027

EASTER CONSERVATION SERVICES

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Jean Easter 1134 East 54th Street
Suite J
Indianapolis, Indiana 46220

Kreilick Conservation, LLC

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T. Scott Kreilick 519 Toll Road
Oreland, PA 19075

Period Furniture Conservation, LLC

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Yuri Yanchyshyn 37-18 Northern Blvd STE 407
Long Island City, NY 11101

Daedalus, Inc.

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Clifford Craine 205-3 Arlington street
Watertown, MA 02472

Mckay Lodge Conservation Lab., Inc.

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Robert Lodge 10915 Pyle Rd.
Oberlin, OH 44074

Sculpture and Decorative Arts Conservation Service

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Barbara Mangum 9 Josephine Ave.
Somerville, Massachusetts 02144